Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a hand condition wherein one or more fingers becomes permanently fixed in a flexed position. This is also called the Viking disease.

But at Marina Plastic Surgery, our hand surgery specialist team can assure you that we have the knowledge, treatments and procedures needed to relieve your pain based on our success rate with past patients.

Overview

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a hand condition wherein one or more fingers becomes permanently fixed in a flexed position. This is also called the Viking disease.

The official cause is still unknown and is oftentimes attributed to genetics, alcoholism, smoking, diseases linked to the thyroid glands and liver, trauma, epilepsy and diabetes.

This condition often affects males over the age of 50.

This is a progressive condition that will worsen if left unchecked. There is no guarantee of the condition not recurring as the patient ages.

Best Candidates

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Men and women with good general health and realistic expectations who are as close as possible to their ideal BMI based on age, height and other physical factors who are suffering from Dupuytren’s contracture.
martin rees

Martin Rees

MB ChB. FRACS

Martin Rees is a Cosmetic and Reconstructive Plastic Surgeon who has been in private practice since 1988, founding the Auckland…

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What to Expect

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a hand condition wherein one or more fingers becomes permanently fixed in a flexed position. This is also called the Viking disease.

But at Marina Plastic Surgery, our hand surgery specialist team can assure you that we have the knowledge, treatments and procedures needed to relieve your pain based on our success rate with past patients.

fixing a hand condition: dupuytren's contracture

After Surgery / Recovery

As with all types of surgical procedures, caring for the areas where sutures were made is the highest priority. Following your hand surgery specialist’s instruction for the proper care of affected areas is highly advised.

Minimal pain management can be administered by hospital staff or by the patient. It can be oral or through intravenous methods.

Physical therapy will be introduced gradually for muscle strengthening and fortifying the areas operated on.

Finger splints may be used in the first few days after the operation if surgery is done. The use of K wires may also be used if surgery was applied.

Procedure Planner

Initial Meeting

45 – 60 minutes

Pre-op

30 – 45 minutes

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Procedure Time

up to 2 hours. Longer if additional procedures are done.

Recovery Time

4 – 6 weeks. Longer for people who do physical work

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Post-op Follow Up

1 week

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